UA Cares: Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week

Crohnspng.pngToday is the start of Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week, which runs from December 1st-7th. There are around 1.3 million people in the U.S. alone with a form of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) known as the ‘invisible illness.’ Join us this week to increase understanding and spread more awareness of Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis and those impacted by these diseases.

 

What is Crohn’s Disease? 

Crohn’s most commonly affects the end of the small bowel and the beginning of the colon. However, it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Some symptoms are the urgent need to move bowels, abdominal cramps and pain, constipation, and more. Crohn’s is more common among adolescents and young adults between the ages of 15 and 35.

What is Ulcerative Colitis?

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease of the large intestine (colon). The lining of the colon becomes inflamed and can develop tiny open sores or ulcers, that produce pus and mucus. The combination of inflammation and ulceration can cause abdominal discomfort and frequent emptying of the colon.

What is the difference between Crohn’s and Colitis?

Crohn’s disease can affect any part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but ulcerative colitis only affects the colon. While Crohn’s disease can affect all layers of the bowel wall, ulcerative colitis only affects the lining of the colon.

How We Can Help: 

  1. Wear purple.
  2. Donate. 
  3. Share Your Story. 
  4. Spread awareness, tell a friend.

While IBD patients may look healthy, internally they may be suffering and there is no one-size-fits-all Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Read about our 2016 Scrub Superstar, Ziky’s experience with Crohn’s disease. 

Wear purple scrubs to support a friend, family member, or loved one with the disease. Comment below and share with us how you’re giving back to important causes this holiday season.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: